Decade-old Bluetooth flaw lets hackers steal data passing between devices

A large scale patching exercise to resolve a serious vulnerability in the Bluetooth specification that allows attackers to intercept and tamper with data exchanged wirelessly is underway. The disclosure in a research paper is serious because it allows people to perform a man-in-the-middle attack on the connection between vulnerable devices, reports Arstechnica


From there, attackers can view any exchanged data, which might include contacts stored on a device, passwords typed on a keyboard, or sensitive information used by medical, point-of-sale, or automotive equipment. Attackers could also forge keystrokes on a Bluetooth keyboard to open up a command window or malicious website in an outright compromise of the connected phone or computer.


“This attack lets an attacker who can read and modify Bluetooth traffic during pairing force the key to be something they know,” JP Smith, a security engineer and Bluetooth security expert at security firm Trail of Bits, told Ars. “It’s not mathematically/theoretically novel at all, and it’s in fact about the simplest attack you can do on elliptic curve cryptosystems. Notably, this is a protocol-level fault, so if you implemented the Bluetooth spec out of the book (without some optional validation), you have this bug.”

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