KeyPass Ransomware On The Loose With Hidden Threat

A new breed of ransomware is spreading around the world and hidden code suggests those behind it could use it to launch more sophisticated attacks in future. KeyPass ransomware first appeared earlier this month, hitting more than 20 countries via fake software installers which download the ransomware onto the victim's computer.


Brazil and Vietnam account for the highest percentage of Keypass infections, but infections reported across the world in regions including South America, Africa, Europe, the Middle East and Asia.


Experts at Kaspersky Lab examined KeyPass and discovered that while it's relatively simple, it comes with the additional option for the attackers to take manual control of an infected system, potentially pointing towards the ability to launch more sophisticated attacks on infected networks.


The Kaspersky report states: "From our point of view, the most interesting feature of the KeyPass Trojan is the ability to take ‘manual control’. The Trojan contains a form that is hidden by default, but which can be shown after pressing a special button on the keyboard. This capability might be an indication that the criminals behind the Trojan intend to use it in manual attacks."

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