New Wave Of Iranian Cyberattacks Could Follow Nuclear Rejection

President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the nuclear deal with Iran may escalate the risk of confrontation of another kind: in cyberspace. Former government officials and security experts say  reinstating sanctions on the country could lead Tehran-backed hackers to retaliate against the West after several years of relative quiet

Michael Daniel, who was President Barack Obama’s White House cybersecurity coordinator, told the Washington Post Iran may have fewer qualms about using its cyber capabilities without the diplomatic agreement in place.

“Now that the level of enmity between the United States and Iran is going to only increase, that does free them to carry out cyber operations against the United States,” Daniel said.

As the United States and European countries previously imposed sanctions on Iran to further thwart its nuclear weapons ambitions, Iranian hackers responded with waves of direct denial of service attacks on U.S. financial institutions that crashed bank computer networks and caused millions of dollars in lost business between 2011 and 2013.

Tension subsided around the time that the Iran deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, was finalised in July 2015. The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, a nonpartisan foreign policy think tank, noted in a report earlier this year that Iran’s disruptive attacks on the United States declined, and Iran turned its focus to Saudi Arabia and other regional adversaries in the Middle East.

more news

65000 GDPR Data Breaches In Europe To Date


European privacy authorities have received almost 65,000 data breach notifications since the EU's new privacy law went into full effect. In addition, regulators in 11 European countries have imposed $63 million in General Data Protection Regulation fines.

read more

More than half of British firms 'report cyberattacks in 2019'


The proportion of UK firms reporting a cyberattack has jumped, despite most businesses admitting they are under-prepared for breaches, according to research from Hiscox reported by the BBC. The insurer found 55 per cent had faced an attack in 2019, up from 40 per cent last year.

read more

Sloppy IT Processes Risk Cyberattacks - McAfee


McAfee this week published a report that turns familiar survey findings on their heads by reporting that most cybersecurity breaches are the result of lax IT processes rather than mistakes made by end users.

read more

Cybercrime Soaring Reports MalwareBytes


Cybercrime is accelerating at a worrying rate, reports MalwareBytes in its Q1 2019 report. Every quarter that goes by shows more alarming data as to how much cybercrime activity is going on out there, with organizations and companies being called to face and deal with an increasing amount of threats, coming literally from everywhere.

read more